All posts by Ezekiel Boston

A Boy Named Evil

Ultrahumans
A Boy Named Evil

Born into a line of super villains with ironclad power, fourteen-year-old Evil wants nothing more than to escape his legacy and give up the last name Overlord forever.

He accidentally draws the attention of the Power League–heroes working to topple the Overlord regime.

Evil’s hopes and dreams come crashing down, forcing him to choose between his mother’s gentle morals and his father’s devastating convictions.

The world refuses to give Evil a chance. What chance can Evil give the world.


4.99

Also available at: Amazon
iTunes, Kobo, Nook are still propagating.

Got it free or at a discount and would
like to make up the difference?

Sins Of The Fathers: A Super Collection Of Superhero Stories

It is a pleasure to report that my short novel A Boy Named Evil, Ultrahumans has been collected into the Sins Of The Fathers Bundle.

 

Time passes. Teenage sidekicks grow up. Heroes and villains settle down and start families.

The bundle is themed around the next generation of kids taking over the family superhero/villain business. Stories about people in masks and how they interact with the youngsters coming along, rather than just inter-generational family drama. Superheroes make everything crazier.

Does the hero retire gracefully and let the teen sidekick take over the name and costume? Did the children of a supervillain join the family business, or become heroes and work to thwart their own parental units?

What happens, when ties of family intersect and tangle with ties of crime-fighting?
 

Table of Contents:
— “Hunted” by Annie Reed
— “Expectations” by Blaze Ward
— “T-Minus Zero Plus Forever” by Ron Collins & John C. Bodin
— “Bamboo and Pine” by Leah Cutter
— “Not-So-Fortunate Son” by Robert Jeschonek
— “A Boy Named Evil, Ultrahumans” by Ezekiel James Boston
— “Cops and Fathers” by M. L. Buchman
— “Ella Saves the World” by Rebecca M. Senese
— “No Money in Heroism” by Stefon Mears
— “The Fantabulous Flying Cupcakes of Terror-Missed-You” by Louisa Swann
 

Over 550 pages of super-powered fiction!

You can pick up the bundle from: Amazon, Kobo, iTunes, Barnes & Nobel, and BundleRabbit.

Sins of The Fathers

Blade Runner 2049

When I first heard of this project, I thought my usual sequel / prequel thought, Hollywood’s after my wallet again! and instantly put up my guard. I’m not alone. Many fans of classic films and amazing single title outings go directly into resist mode, and given some of the train-wrecks we’ve experience, can you blame us?

Typically I’m on the other side of fandom. The take my money side. Though I worried that they were be bad, I was there for Transformers, Turtles, and Ghostbusters. Admittedly, I was happy with these franchises staring back up and liked bits of all the movies; even felt Ghostbusters was entertaining.

However, Hollywood has reached into my pocket too often and Bladerunner (like Big Trouble in Little China) has a special place in my mind. So, I slapped Hollywood’s grubby hands away from my wallet and waited for reactions.

The first wave of fan-friends who saw it opening night raved. Good enough for me. I went.

After the viewing, I thought, Wow, I felt that world. To me, it totally shattered any preexisting atmospheric record and connected perfectly with the old Blade Runner feel. There wasn’t any hyper changes from the original (like, say, podracing); just more of the same. Wait. Not just more of the same, but more depth in the same world.

The 2049 world felt like it evolved form the original Bladerunner and things weren’t too vastly different. Sure there were more invasive ads, but we’re experiencing that now. The overpopulation was almost forever present and street vending remained the main source way to attain food.

I thoroughly enjoyed the world. And the tone.

The story told in the world, meh. I know some of my friends are screaming WHAT?!

*Shrug.* It was meh. To me.

At the time, I couldn’t quite put my finger on why. I enjoyed the experience and wanted to see it again to get that immersive feel, but didn’t. Something was off and I couldn’t tell what.

Now, I think it has to do with the main character; K. Maybe it was knowing that he was a replicant from the beginning, maybe because it felt like he was doing his job reluctantly instead of it driving him, maybe it was his buy-in on his entirely virtual girlfriend. I get why that last one is an important story element, but it smacked of this guy is a victim of his world.

I think that’s what bothered me at a subconscious level. This guy was suffering, but his suffering didn’t drive him to improve his life or make the world better. He had relented to it. You know, just getting by, and while that might be the way that many folks live their lives, it’s not the kind of life I want to pay money to see (a second time).

In fact, almost every other character in the movie was more compelling than K. The bad guy, his lieutenant, K’s boss, even the memory makers. All of them were more active in their own lives than K.

2049 was a very robust and alive world focused on a might-as-well-be-dead character. A might-as-well-be-dead character who never struggled to get a pulse. Sure, he might have felt special for a moment, but beyond that, he was a merely a tool in the story. Any other Blade Runner could’ve done the same.

And that’s where I think this movie failed me. It was very much a continuation of the world quite good in my opinion, but not the kind of good that will get me to buy a second ticket or own it on Blu-Ray. Further, is a friend said, “Let’s go see 2049. My treat.” I’d probably asked, “What else is playing?”

 

Duty, Honor, Country: 8 Tales Of Bravery And Heroism

It is a pleasure to report that my short story Soul Survivor has been collected into the Duty, Honor, Country: 8 Tales Of Bravery And Heroism Bundle. There are eight titles:
      — Return to Honor By Doug Beason
      — For Her Dark Eyes Only By M. L. Buchman
      — The Spring By Harvey Stanbrough
      — Frozen Heart By J. D. Brink
      — Forced Conversion By Donald J. Bingle
      — Soul Survivor, Buck Tales By Ezekiel James Boston
      — Her Heart and the “Friend” Command By M. L. Buchman
      — Strike Eagle By Doug Beason

Over 1,100 pages of military fiction. Get some.

You can pick up the bundle from: Amazon, Kobo, iTunes, Barnes & Nobel, and BundleRabbit.

Duty, Honor, Country

171231 | 6¢ | 3K-6K | 2019 Young Explorer’s Adventure Guide

For more info, go to: http://dreamingrobotpress.com/young-explorers-adventure-guide-submissions/

2019 YOUNG EXPLORER’S ADVENTURE GUIDE SUBMISSIONS

WE’RE LOOKING FOR STORIES THAT:

  • Have a main character that a middle grade reader (ages 8-12) can identify with;
  • Show a diverse set of real characters;
  • Are well written, fun to read, and encourage a love of reading science fiction;
  • Tell of adventure, space, science.  Give us rockets, robots and alien encounters, and we’re pretty happy; Steampunk, time travel, weird west and alternate history are all fine;
  • Are between 3,000 and 6,000 words.

To be super clear – we’re looking science fiction, in all its variants. While we love fantasy as well, please don’t submit fantasy stories for this anthology.

We’re especially looking for stories:

  • Of adventure!  We love a good dystopia as much as the next robot, but remember – this is the Young Explorer’s Adventure Guide;
  • Where the main character is of a population that has traditionally been under-represented in science fiction, e.g. girls, people of color, differently abled people;
  • Where the main character has agency, exercises it, and isn’t just along for the ride.

We are strong supporters of both the #weneeddiversebooks and #ownvoices movements.

 

We’re not interested in:

  • Stories where the female characters primarily exist to be rescued or as a prize for the males;
  • Stories where the primary plot or subplot is romantic in nature;
  • Stories with graphic violence or any form of sexual activity;
  • Stories with any violence towards animals;
  • Stories about the first girl to do X, surprising everyone;
  • Stories that depict any ethnicity or gender as universally bad or stupid.

Please note:  although we’re aware kids have a wide and varied vocabulary, we’d prefer not to have swearing in the stories. If your story has swearing, please rephrase before submitting.

Submission deadline, mechanics and planned schedule:

  • Anthology will be open for submissions from July 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017, with a reading period of January and February 2018.
  • While we prefer original stories, if you have something perfect that had a limited run elsewhere, query us and we’ll talk;
  • Acceptance notices will be sent by March 30, 2018;
  • In the summer we will launch a crowd-funding campaign to help with pre-publication costs. Regardless of results of crowd-funding campaign, we are committed to publishing the anthology. We’ve successfully funded the previous three anthologies this way, chances are favorable.

Rights and Payments:

  • Authors will be provided with a complete Anthology Contract for review and consideration with the notice of accepted submissions.
  • In keeping with SWFA’s guidelines, we pay $0.06/word on final edited word count for one-year exclusive worldwide English rights and  nonexclusive right to republish, print, or reprint the complete anthology in any language or format after the first year, print and electronic, and two contributor copies. Payment upon final edit.
  • If the crowd-funding fails, please note that we are still committed to this anthology, and will find other ways to fund the project. However, there may be delays. If authors feel the need to withdraw their submission due to delays, we understand.
  • We will provide professional editing, primarily for issues of grammar and spelling.
  • If authors have other questions about rights or payments, please contact us before submission. We want to make sure all concerns are addressed.

More questions?  Check the full description page for last year’s anthology here. Have more questions? Contact us!

For more info, go to: http://dreamingrobotpress.com/young-explorers-adventure-guide-submissions/

Jamal & the Skeleton’s Heart, Buck Tales

Being immortal, Jamal always has trouble keeping friends. Most times it seems like he just gets to know someone when then hit their expiration date. They shuffle off to whatever is after life, leaving him scratching his head.

Only this time, after being buried, his friend Newt–a non-binary skeleton–rose from the dead with a problem. A former lover and necromancer had stolen Newt’s heart from his grave.

Jamal agrees to retrieve the heart. And runs into his own brand of trouble. The kind that could end him.

$0.99

 

Free Fiction: Nexus Bar & Grill, World of Benjamin Baxter

Hello. After last month’s short, stark story (Soul Survivor), I want to get back to a world that I thoroughly enjoy playing in and a length with with I’m more comfortable.

While Benjamin Baxter is in this ‘Starwise’ novelette, the tale is more about the building and diviner from the Census Agency. This should be a treat for the readers who who requested to see more of the world from other points of view.

[ Teaser: I’m also working on a ‘Might-Lands’ project called Mr. Sam. ]


* From the fantasy World of Benjamin Baxter *

The Nexus Bar & Grill is one of the oldest buildings and most powerful locations in Las Vegas. Though the centuries, it has passed from owner to owner with little to no documentation.

A force for uncovering corruption, Census Agency Auditor Ally Dazs plans on changing that. And ferreting out who now owns the building should be the key she needs to make the Agency sit up and take notice.

She knows the task ahead of her and she’s never backed down from a challenge.

It’s time to put Las Vegas on warning.

This story was available for free from:
February 20, 2017
to
March 20, 2017
–EJ–

Copyright © 2016 by Ezekiel James Boston
Cover art copyright © EyeMark